Fraudsters back in business with job offers in UK

Forging letters from professional recruiters, they target young graduates and skilled workers

several large-scale employers bouncing back to the usual pace of international recruitments, fraudsters who had earlier flourished in illegal recruitment business through fake job offers are back.

Forging appointment letters from professional recruiters offering attractive pay packages and liberal terms and conditions, they mostly target young graduates and skilled workers who are keen on working in the United Kingdom (UK).

The low-cost technical procedures and minimal service charges have turned out to be the biggest bait for low-income aspirants. In addition, fake offer letter creators promise easy migration and appointment without clearing mandatory language proficiency tests like IELTS or OET. Noticing the trend, professionals from Kerala in the UK are making aspirants aware of the scam through social media.

“I was shocked to see a fraudulent appointment letter received by a friend recently. Whatever details in the letter appeared wrong to me. Those who respond to such offers without proper verification are sure to lose their money,” said Nirish Antony, a former Childline coordinator who recently secured placement as a psychiatric social worker in London. He pointed out that the spurt in new job openings subsequent to the diminishing pandemic scare has turned out to be an opportunity for fraudsters.

A few who identified fake appointment letters said fraudsters who secured bio-data and email addresses from various sources were cunning enough to behave professionally and demand a meagre amount initially. Many a time, the tendency among aspirants to bypass standard procedures for convenience lands them in traps, they said.

“For qualified professionals, there is no shortcut to reach UK. Also, there are no big expenses involved in securing a job the legal way,” said M. Manoj, a registered nurse from Kannur who works under the National Health Service, UK. According to him, many youths are even disinclined to contact their relatives or friends abroad for a personal verification ahead of proceeding with fake offers.

Ajith Kolassery, General Manager, NoRKA Roots, said he had come across several candidates who had earlier received fake offer letters from Canada and East European countries, as the trickery had been in place for a long time in various forms. “We have a lot of options to check the authenticity of such letters. Basically, one should reject offers that prompt aspirants to evade recruitment procedures approved by the government,” he added.

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